Terence McKenna

terence mckenna on mushrooms

If you’ve never heard of Terence McKenna, you are in for a treat. McKenna was an America philosopher who focused on the nature of consciousness and its relationship with psychedelic drugs.  One of his long standing theories about the nature of conscious evolution, that I find to be very compelling, was that primitive man encountered psychedelic mushrooms, and it was the incorporation of psychedelics into the primitive diet that prompted self-realization and language to come into existence.

McKenna is also no fan of the state, which he calls an “ape man political system.” Obviously I share some agreements with him on this point. While I don’t agree with every thing that McKenna has to say, I do agree with the vast majority of it. He’s not a political philosopher, so don’t expect to hear any references to Menger or Rothbard, but his take on consciousness is quite extraordinary and very compatible with what I have come to discover through other routes of inquiry myself.

Some of his insights about psychedelic mushrooms include the possibility that such mushrooms are potentially alien to the Earth’s natural ecosystems. If you consider that each mushroom is capable of emitting millions upon millions of spores, and that the spores are so small that they can be subject to electrostatic forces in the environment, it is possible for those spores to be carried aloft out of Earth’s atmosphere. Mushroom spores are practically custom built to survive in the environment of space.  Assuming spores are capable of being pushed into outer space by electrostatic forces, a mushroom species could potentially colonize the habitable planets of the galaxy in around 40 million years. Given that mushrooms are non-invasive, and occupy the very bottom of the food chain since they primarily survive on decomposing organic matter, their survivability among alien worlds is very high.

It is also interesting to note that psilocybin (the psychedelic drug in mushrooms), when taken in low doses, increases visual acuity by increasing edge detection. Grass land animals who incorporated psilocybin into their diet would have a competitive advantage over those who did not. There are many other interesting effects of psilocybin that most people don’t know about because of their illegal status and the prohibition on psychedelic research.

Growing Azurescens.

azurescens spores

These 3 mushrooms grow in the colder and wetter places on Earth. Therefore they are no good to grow indoors. This means that growing these mushrooms is not for everybody. You must live in a place where autumn is cold and wet and besides you need to find a location where you can lay the bed and where it is safe throughout the year.

We are thinking of a bed in the garden (or woods) of 80 * 80 * 10 cm.

These mushrooms come up in the autumn and in the beginning of the winter. The whole process from preparing the spawn until the mushrooms come out is a process that will take very long. If you want to harvest these mushrooms in the autumn, you actually must start at the beginning of the year (Jan/Feb).

The growing process normally has 3 phases: – preparing the spawn – growing the mycelium outdoors – growing the mushrooms

buy azurescen spores

First you must prepare the spawn. You do not need that much: 300 to 400 ml. is enough. Rye is the best basis for spawn and the mycelium of these mushrooms grows best in the incubator with a temperature of 20 °C.

When the rye is totally colonized, it is time for the next step in preparing the spawn. The Psilocybe azurescens, cyanescens and baeocystis love woodchips. The colonized rye will also be helpful in colonizing a part of the woodchips with mycelium.

It does not really matter what kind of woodchips you use. In general the mushrooms grow very well on almost all kinds of woodchips. We use the ones that you can buy in the pet shops to use as underground for your pet house.

Before you inoculate the woodchips with the colonized rye, you must first soften them by soaking them. Fill up 2 pots of 1000 ml for 60% with small woodchips and totally cover the woodchips with water. Let them soak for 48 hours. After 48 hours let the 2 pots with the woodchips leak out in a strainer. Do this very thoroughly. Fill the 2 pots again with the prepared woodchips and close the pots with a lid with a filter. The pots must be now sterilized for 1 hour on 15 psi. Let the pots quietly cool down afterwards.

If the pots have cooled down entirely, you can start to inoculate with rye. Divide de rye over the 2 pots. After inoculation you must give the 2 pots a good shake to spread the rye. After that, place the pots in the incubator (18 – 20 °C.).

After 2 up to 4 weeks the pots have been entirely colonized. From time to time shake the pots well to speed up the process. Once this has happened, it is time to prepare for the open air.

For an outside ‘bed’ of 80 * 80*10 cm. you need approximately 10 liters of woodchips. It is all right if these woodchips are a bit larger than the ones you used for making the brood. Put these 10 liters in a garbage bag and add plenty water. Let this now soak for 24 hours. After these 24 hours the bag must leak out entirely. Make some small holes in the bag tot make that happen. And cut off, after a while, the corners on the bottom of the garbage bag. Wait till there is no more water left.

Put your boots on! Go outside and dig a hole in the ground of your desired size. It is smart to choose a spot with much shade. Scatter a layer of 4 – 5 centimeters woodchips on the floor. Take the 2 pots with brood (loosened up by shaking) and scatter these over the complete bed. Cover this again with a few centimeters of wet woodchip. The bed is almost ready now. Irrigate the bed and cover it with a garbage bag. This makes the bed the ideal environment for the mushrooms, nice wet and dark. You can keep the bag in its place by laying some stones on the edge.

The best time of the year to make such an outside bed is around March/April. Your work is down for now. During spring and summer the mycelium needs enough time to build a firm network thorough the whole bed of woodchips. Verify, however, on a regular basis if the bed still has a nice humid condition. Spray the bed with water if nescessary.

At the beginning of September the weather becomes colder and wetter: the ideal circumstances for the growing mushrooms. Remove the garbage bag and give the bed, if needed, a good irrigation to keep it humid. You will probably see a number of insects and other small beasts walking around in and on your bed. Do not worry; these small creatures will not damage your work. They do not have an influence on the quality of the bed or the growing of your mushrooms, except in extreme cases (plagues etc.) I would almost say: give them the space and let them enjoy the mycelium…

It is difficult to indicate when the mushrooms will rise. This is entirely dependent on the specific weather of that particularly autumn. You can expect them from mid- September up to beginning December. Care at all times that the bed will not dry out.

It can be that in one autumn several flushes will rise. After the last flush you can simple leave the bed. The mycelium should not have too much trouble surviving the winter and giving flushes the next year. It is nevertheless wise to spread out, at the beginning of a new spring, a fresh layer of woodchips on the bed.

Source

How magic mushrooms work

PF Tek

Mushrooms have a lot in common with LSD in terms of how they affect the body. Both are psychotropic drugs and act on the central nervous system to produce their effects. Many people have described a mushroom trip as a milder, shorter version of an LSD trip. Like LSD, magic mushrooms don’t technically cause hallucinations, or visions of things that aren’t actually there. Instead, they distort the perception of actual objects.People tripping on mushrooms might see things in different colors or see patterns. Existing colors, sounds, tastes and textures may be distorted, while feelings and emotions intensify. It can feel like time has sped up, slowed down or stopped completely. There can be a changed perception of one’s place in the universe and a feeling of communing with a higher power.

As with LSD, what happens on a mushroom trip varies by person, dosage and the type of mushroom eaten, as some are more powerful than others. “Set and setting,” or the emotional state of the user and the type of environment he or she is in, play a big part in whether the trip is positive. Users who are in a poor mental state or a highly structured environment are more likely to have a bad trip, which is when you feel paranoid, anxious, nervous or even terrified instead of euphoric. The only way to get over a bad trip is to wait it out. New users are often advised to have an experienced friend with them to guide them through the experience.

Taking mushrooms can cause dizziness, nausea and other stomach problems, muscle weakness, loss of appetite and numbness. These symptoms subside as the trip comes to an end. Some mushroom users smoke marijuana to combat the nausea.

Mushrooms aren’t considered to be addictive, but tolerance builds up very quickly — taking mushrooms two days in a row often results in a less intense experience the second day, for example. There may be cross-tolerance with some other psychotropic drugs like LSD, mescaline and peyote, which means that taking one can build up tolerance for another.

So, are they dangerous? People with mental illnesses (diagnosed or not) have had their symptoms exacerbated through the use of mushrooms. There’s no evidence of death caused by magic mushrooms; the amount that one would have to eat to cause death is hundreds of times greater than the normal dose. Death can result from taking misidentified mushrooms, however. With that in mind, let’s look at the different types of magic mushrooms next.

Mushrooms have a lot in common with LSD in terms of how they affect the body. Both are psychotropic drugs and act on the central nervous system to produce their effects. Many people have described a mushroom trip as a milder, shorter version of an LSD trip. Like LSD, magic mushrooms don’t technically cause hallucinations, or visions of things that aren’t actually there. Instead, they distort the perception of actual objects.

People tripping on mushrooms might see things in different colors or see patterns. Existing colors, sounds, tastes and textures may be distorted, while feelings and emotions intensify. It can feel like time has sped up, slowed down or stopped completely. There can be a changed perception of one’s place in the universe and a feeling of communing with a higher power.

As with LSD, what happens on a mushroom trip varies by person, dosage and the type of mushroom eaten, as some are more powerful than others. “Set and setting,” or the emotional state of the user and the type of environment he or she is in, play a big part in whether the trip is positive. Users who are in a poor mental state or a highly structured environment are more likely to have a bad trip, which is when you feel paranoid, anxious, nervous or even terrified instead of euphoric. The only way to get over a bad trip is to wait it out. New users are often advised to have an experienced friend with them to guide them through the experience.

Taking mushrooms can cause dizziness, nausea and other stomach problems, muscle weakness, loss of appetite and numbness. These symptoms subside as the trip comes to an end. Some mushroom users smoke Marijuana to combat the nausea.

Mushrooms aren’t considered to be addictive, but tolerance builds up very quickly — taking mushrooms two days in a row often results in a less intense experience the second day, for example. There may be cross-tolerance with some other psychotropic drugs like LSD, mescaline and peyote, which means that taking one can build up tolerance for another.

So, are they dangerous? People with mental illnesses (diagnosed or not) have had their symptoms exacerbated through the use of mushrooms. There’s no evidence of death caused by magic mushrooms; the amount that one would have to eat to cause death is hundreds of times greater than the normal dose. Death can result from taking misidentified mushrooms, however. With that in mind, let’s look at the different types of magic mushrooms next.

Foraging for wild magic mushrooms is dicey. There are thousan­ds of species, many with very similar features. Some toxic mushrooms can simply cause stomach problems, but others can cause organ failure and death. Hunting for any type of edible mushroom is generally best left to people who are very knowledgeable about mushroom identification. Even people who have been hunting mushrooms for decades have made mistakes. One part of the identification process is the creation of a spore print, which involves pressing the cap gill-side down onto a sheet of paper (usually both dark and white to see contrast) so that its spores are released. (We’ll talk more about the uses for spore prints later.)

There are dozens of species of mushroom within the genus Psilocybe. Most of them are on the small side — the average size is a 3-inch stalk and a 1-inch cap. When fresh, they usually have light grayish, yellowish or brownish stems with brown or brown-and-white caps and dark gills. We’ll look at just a few of the most well-known varieties.

  • Psilocybe cubensis is on the larger side as far as magic mushrooms go. It’s also one of the most common. Called the common large Psilocybe, golden cap or Mexican mushroom, it has many different types. The cap is usually reddish brown, with a white or yellowish stem. When bruised or crushed, its sticky flesh often turns bluish. Some people consider this a definitive sign of finding a magic mushroom, but some toxic types of mushrooms bruise as well. It’s usually found in moist, humid climates and grows on the dung of grazing animals like cattle.
  • Psilocybe semilanceata or liberty cap is a common psilocybin mushroom. In general, P. semilanceata is found in damp, grassy fields usually populated by cattle or sheep but unlike P. cubensis, it doesn’t grow directly on the dung. It’s a small mushroom, either light yellow or brown, with a very pointed cap. Another psilocybe mushroom, Psilocybe pelliculosa, is often mistaken for P. semilanceata, but its psychotropic properties are weaker.
  • Psilocybe baeocystis has a dark brown cap and brownish or yellowish stem when fresh. It can be found in fields in addition to growing on rotting logs, peat or mulch. Nicknames include potent Psilocybe, blue bell and bottle cap.

So do people who take magic mushrooms just pop a few into their mouths? Next, let’s learn about what’s considered a “dose” and the ways in which people consume magic mushrooms

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Magic Mushroom Spores

A spore is reproductive structure of a certain mushroom that is meant to be dispersed for reproduction. These spores have the ability to thrive for long periods in unfavourable conditions while waiting for the conditions to turn favourable. Resulting in asexual reproduction where each spore grows into a new organism under the favourable conditions, Creating mycelium.

One of the most common colloquial terms for psilocybin mushrooms, is shrooms or magic mushrooms. The best way to identify a mushroom is by its spore print. One part of the identification process is the creation of a spore print, which requires placing a mushroom cap gill side down on a piece of paper or foil.

These mushroom spores through the use of microscopy, not only identify the wild mushrooms, they can also be used in the cultivation of magic mushrooms, where it is legal to do so.

Psilocybin and psilocin are the active illegal compounds found in these mushrooms, and spore prints do not contain either of these chemical compounds, this makes mushroom spores legal to possess. In most places around the world. But be sure to check your local laws before ordering.

Contests

New Contest July 2014

 

July 2014

From time to time we like to hold contests because well, we like giving away free spores!

This month we are giving away one free mega mushroom pack and 2 four for 40 packs with three ways to win.

#1 Follow  us on our Facebook and  Twitter
for exclusive giveaways, contests, and coupon codes. All new follows will be entered to win. Winner will receive a 4 for 40 mushroom pack.

#2 Post a link to www.mushroomprints.com or your site, blog or anywhere out there on the web email us the link and you will be entered to win the Mega mushroom pack

#3 Tell us about your past mushroom prints experience, and the winner will receive a 4 for 40 spore syringe pack

entries from each category will be drawn at random winners will be notified via email, and result posted here.

 

Good luck all

 

– Mushroom Prints 2014

 

 

Congrats to our photo contest winners!

Our Photo contest  is now complete.

A 4 for 40 mushroom syringe pack is yours.

Winners are:

By Christine Webb


By Nicholas Byrd


by Photo Steve


amanita-muscariaJuly 2013

A while back, we had a great idea come in from a customer to have a mushroom photography contest .Email us up to 5 of your mushroom photography photos. Please include a description if possible. Such as type of mushroom, location of photograph, etc…

At the end of the month we will select the top three photos
winners will receive a 4 for 40 mushroom pack of your choice of Psilocybe cubensis or edible culture syringes.

So what are you waiting for. Get to it !

 

Check back regularly to see whats happening.

December 2012 Contest

magic-mushroomsHappy Holidays!

We are giving away 3 of our ‘4 for 40′ Mushroom syringe packs.
Thats 4 psilocybe Cubensis syringes free!

How to win:

We have hidden an image on one of our pages. Could be a product, blog post, or any other page on our site.
To win simply find this image

and drop us an email at Sales@mushroomprints.com letting us know where you found it and you will be entered in our month end draw.

Winners will be notified via email.
Good luck on your search

Remember to join us on Facebook and Twitter, for more contests, coupon codes and other fun stuff.

6 Ways Mushrooms Can Help Save the World.

Mycelium running by Paul Stamets is a great book, included many different mushroom growing techniques, such as making liquid cultures using water, sugar, and a bit of salt to limit bacterial growth. Also he shows a technique for using Azurescens and Cyanescens spores in vegetable oil to produce a chain saw oil for logging, which would in turn repopulate the forest with healthy mycelium. We really recommend this book as well as all of his other books, especially The Mushroom Cultivator and Psilocybin Mushrooms Of The World

Below are comments on Mycelium Running by Dr Mercola

Mycologist Paul Stamets studies the mycelium — and lists 6 ways that this astonishing fungus can help save the world

Paul Stamets has the kind of forward-thinking mind that stands to make a real difference for the future of the planet. At first it may seem strange to be as passionate about fungus as Stamets is, but his vision is in many ways parallel to mine: improve the health of the population and the planet using natural means.“There are more species of fungi, bacteria, and protozoa in a single scoop of soil than there are plants and vertebrate animals in all of North America,” Stamets writes in his book Mycelium Running: How Mushrooms Can Help Save The World (which, by the way, is well worth reading if you find this topic as intriguing as I do).And it seems there is virtually no limit to what these fungal spores — which Stamets calls “the neurological network of nature” — can do:

  • Restore habitat that’s been devastated by pollution
  • Naturally fight flu viruses and other diseases
  • Kill ants, termites and other insects without the use of pesticides
  • Create a sustainable fuel known as Econol
It’s hard to imagine that in one cubic inch of soil, there could be eight miles of mycelium — or that it can hold 30,000 times its mass. But, then again, the best solutions are often the most obvious — and the simplest. And as the first organism to come to land — many thousands of years ago and still going strong — fungi must be doing something right.Mushrooms for Your HealthJust as mushrooms can strengthen the immune system of the environment, they can also strengthen the immune system in your body. Aside from being rich in protein, fiber, vitamin C, B vitamins, calcium and minerals, there are about 50 species of medicinal mushrooms that are rich in antioxidants they can do everything from boost your immune function to lower your risk of cancer, heart disease and allergies.In ancient times, Egyptians and Asians created longevity tonics from mushrooms — and even the 5,000-year-old “Ice Man” that was found in Europe a few years back had dried mushrooms with him.Interestingly, if grown and dried in the right way, mushrooms are also one of the few foods that can provide you with vitamin D. As many of you may know, sun exposure is still the best route to make your vitamin D, but one study found that exposure to ultra violet light could enrich growing, or just-picked mushrooms with a large supply of vitamin D.Stamets’ book that I mentioned above also describes this topic in detail, including a study in which shitake mushrooms increased in vitamin D from 110 IU when they were dried indoors to 21,4000 IU when they were dried in the sunlight!

Getting Back to Sustaining the Earth …

It’s always been apparent that the health of your body is intricately tied to the health of the land, but lately it seems the tides are turning in regard to how we view our connection to nature. Increasing numbers of people are choosing to honor of the laws of nature and are reverting to the more sustainable practices of long-ago generations.

I believe that future health depends on creating sustainable farming practices that will provide pure, nourishing food — and along the way this requires cleaning up the soil that has been pilfered by industry. And what could be a better start to this than Stamets’ “life boxes” — which are cardboard boxes full of fungi and seeds that can grow food, clean up toxic wastes and even provide a new beginning for old-growth forests?

Once again, it seems, the simplest ideas will be the ones that ultimately improve the world.

– Dr. Mercola